IMPLEMENTATION OF A LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS: A CASE STUDY OF KILIMANJARO CHRISTIAN MEDICAL UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

Background

Schools of medicine in Africa face challenges resulting from increasing class sizes, faculty shortages, inadequate infrastructure and limited financial resources. Medical schools are a major component of health care systems, primarily for training and increasing the number medical doctors(Chen et al., 2012).  In addition, they train other health care workers such as dentists and nurses. Despite the extraordinary need for these health care professionals, medical schools in sub-Saharan Africa face challenges in meeting the demand, with limited numbers of medical schools producing insufficient numbers of graduates. According to Mullan et al. (2011), 169 medical schools in 48 countries of sub-Saharan Africa produce some 10,000 graduates per year. However, this number is insufficient to meet the recommended ratio of 1:5,000(Makasa, 2009), and it is also adversely affected by brain drain, unequal geographical distribution, and pursuit of non-medical employment. Medical schools also face shortages of faculty, while the existing faculty are typically overwhelmed with a multitude of duties, facility deficits, and drastic increases in the enrollment number of students without a commensurate increase in faculty growth (Mullan et al., 2011). These factors are likely to compromise the quality of health education and hence the competences of the trained health care professionals.

Enjoyed this article? Stay informed by joining our newsletter!

Comments
You must be logged in to post a comment.
Related Articles
Popular Articles